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Art for Human Rights 2017: interviews with participants

Anna Landreneau, SMU Amnesty International (AI) Vice President and Cox School of Business student, and two of the participating artists, Hannah Aaron and Thania McElroy for Art for Human Rights 2017 agreed to an interview for the Hamon blog about this event, which takes place in Meadows Doolin Gallery, on Saturday, April 22nd.

Continue reading “Art for Human Rights 2017: interviews with participants”

New online exhibition from Hamon’s Bywaters Special Collection: DeForrest Judd Sketches

The Bywaters Special Collection in the Hamon Arts Library has a new online exhibition, DeForrest Judd – Sketches of Texas Regions – Big Bend, Caddo Lake, Gulf Coast.

Judd is a Texas Regionalist, and this collection contains nine sketchbooks from the artist’s trips to Colorado, the Gulf Coast, Caddo Lake, New Mexico, the Big Bend, and the Hill Country in Texas.  Each sketchbook measures approximately [H] 11” x [W] 8 ½”.  Selections from these sketchbooks featured in this online exhibit are from his travels in the 1960s to Big Bend, Caddo Lake, and the Texas Gulf Coast.  The original sketchbooks are part of the DeForrest Judd Art Work and Papers located in Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.


Featured image: Courtesy of DeForrest Judd Art Work and Papers, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University
Link: http://digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm/ref/collection/tar/id/1141
Blog post: Emily Grubbs, Archivist, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library

Eva Hesse Film Screening

The Hamon Arts Library presents

 Eva Hesse
Documentary Film Screening

Wednesday, April 26th at 4 p.m.
Greer Garson Screening Room, Owen Arts Center

Eva Hesse photograph
Eva Hesse

The widely acclaimed 2015 documentary, Eva Hesse explores the life and career of brilliant and influential German-born American artist, Eva Hesse. Hesse was a pioneer of the post-minimalist movement and was one of the few women recognized as central to the New York art scene in the 1960s and 70s.

“This indispensible film will be shining a light on Hesse’s work, and her, for a long time to come.”
–Joe Morgenstern, The Wall Street Journal

Eva Hesse marries through biographical and physiological accounts…an artist’s tragic life and wants for nothing…”
— Benjamin Sutton, Hyperallergic

 

This film screening is presented by the Hamon Arts Library in conjunction with the Hawn Gallery’s current exhibition, Piecing It Together. This event is free and open to the public. For more information please call 214-768-3813.


Promotional images and text: Courtesy of the Eva Hesse Documentary website at evahessedoc.com

Two New Exhibitions at Hamon

Octaviano Rangel: Was he a beast if the music could move him so?
On view on the third floor of Hamon

This exhibition of recent work by Dallas and Monterrey-based artist, Octaviano Rangel is inspired by Franz Kakfa’s Metamorphosis. On view throughout the third floor of Hamon are a series of cut paper, graphite, and ink collages, as well as a graphite drawing created directly on the library wall. Rangel depicts fragmented human figures that evoke a rhythmic dislocation of the human form. Disembodied hands emerge from tangles of intricate lines and human forms take shape within layers of paper, creating a tension between figuration and abstraction. The exhibition takes as its title, the haunting line from Metamorphosis, “Was he a beast if the music could move him so?” when Gregor Samsa is deeply moved whilst listening to his sister play the violin. It is therefore fitting that Rangel is presenting this series of work amidst the music stacks of Hamon.

Dylan Glynn Lost Daughter still

 Dylan Glynn: An Installation of Selected Films
On view on the second floor of Hamon

The films on view on the second floor of Hamon were previously featured in the Hawn Gallery exhibition, Dylan Glynn: After Order, After Disorder. Glynn, A Toronto-based animation filmmaker and illustrator, has developed an ethereal style that captures a fantastical naiveté and nuanced relationship between new and traditional media. Emotive and rich in narration, Glynn’s films feature expansive landscapes sparsely populated by serene, yet impassioned figures struggling to assert their self-hood. Lyrical movement, as well as the deft manipulation and layering of color, characterize the diverse collection of films on view. Presented amidst the second floor stacks, this installation features a selection of seven of Glynn’s most enchanting and technically adept films.


Featured image: Octaviano Rangel, Detail of Was he a beast if the music could move him so?, cut paper, graphite, and ink on paper; dimensions variable
Blog post: Courtesy of Georgia Erger, Curatorial Fellow of the Hawn Gallery, 2016-2017
Images: Courtesy of Octaviano Rangel and Dylan Glynn

Collection Spotlight: Esther Webb Houseman art work and papers

Esther Webb Houseman (1910 – 1992) lived most of her life in Dallas working in the fields of crafts and design. In 1933, with Velma Davis [Dozier], she established the Dallas School of Creative Arts; together they were referred to as “The Lady Blacksmiths.” Their school served as a working and teaching studio and offered instruction primarily in metalsmithing with the addition of other art disciplines including photography, printmaking and creative design. The school was also a social gathering place for Dallas artists during the Great Depression of the 1930s. World War II brought an end to the school due to the shortage of metal, but soon after the war Esther and Velma reestablished their school as the Craft Guild of Dallas, which continues today. The collection includes artwork, clippings, correspondence, documents, photographs, publicity, and published works relating to Esther’s own personal work and that of the Dallas School of Creative Arts and the Craft Guild of Dallas.

Please take a look at the detailed finding aid available through Texas Archival Resources Online here:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00102/smu-00102.html


Image: Courtesy of Esther Webb Houseman art work and papers, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

On View: Piecing It Together

Piecing It Together
Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube & Christopher Reno

On view until May 28th, 2017 in the Hawn Gallery

Piecing It Together presents a selection of abstract paintings and drawings by Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube, and Christopher Reno. These three artists explore the private world of the ‘home’ and seek to demystify, through their abstract works, this insular, domestic space. The artists’ subjects reveal both the contents of the ‘house’ (mundane objects encountered everyday) and associations of ‘home’ (deeply ingrained memories and constructed ideals). These artists draw from their experiences of parenthood and the home, and in doing so, bring to the forefront a view that is uniquely private, yet shared.
Continue reading “On View: Piecing It Together”

Dallas movie theaters & controversy in the 60s and 70s

This post from the WFAA Newsfilm Collection is a series of clips about old movie theaters in Dallas during the sixties and seventies, which were dealing with controversial political and cultural subjects in the community at this time.

Continue reading “Dallas movie theaters & controversy in the 60s and 70s”

Collection Spotlight: Film lobby cards, McCord/Renshaw Collection

 

For the February collection spotlight from the McCord/Renshaw Collection, this collection contains motion picture lobby cards primarily from the early 1930s. The majority of the films in this collection are represented by a complete set (eight 11 x 14″ lobby cards) and include the original envelope in excellent condition. The earliest films in the collection are from the early 1920s and include Camille of Barbary Coast (1925), A Doll’s House (1922), Geared to Go (1924) and The White Sheep (1924). The collection includes lobby cards from several noteworthy films such as The Invisible Man, The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) and Scarface (1932).

Please take a look at the detailed finding aid available through Texas Archival Resources Online here:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00286/smu-00286.html


Feature image: A Doll’s House (1922), Courtesy of McCord/Renshaw Collection, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

Hawn Gallery presents Piecing It Together

The Hawn Gallery presents:

 Piecing It Together

Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube & Christopher Reno

On view March 31 – May 28, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday, April 7th from 6-8 p.m.
at the Hawn Gallery, Hamon Arts Library

Danielle Kimzey - Stars in Her Eyes
Danielle Kimzey, Stars in Her Eyes, gouache on panel, 16 x 16 inches

Piecing It Together features works by Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube, and Christopher Reno. These three painters share an interest in exploring the private world of the ‘home’ and seek to demystify, through their abstract works, this often insular, domestic space. This collected body of work draws upon the artists’ experiences of parenthood and memories of home, and brings to the forefront that which is often considered banal or overly sentimental. All three artists employ a wide range of mediums in their painting practices and rigorously examine diverse modernist and contemporary techniques and ideologies.

Piecing It Together is curated by Georgia Erger, the Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery. An Opening Reception will be held in the gallery on Friday, April 7th from 6-8 p.m. wherein artists, Danielle Kimzey and Christopher Reno will conduct a gallery talk.

Danielle Kimzey is based in Dallas and studied Painting and Drawing at the University of Iowa and Southern Methodist University. Her work has been exhibited nationally in Dallas, Memphis, and Irvine and internationally in Berlin. Mary Laube is based in Cleveland and studied Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture at the University of Iowa and Illinois State University. Her work has been exhibited nationally in Dallas, New York, and Philadelphia and internationally in Gimpo, South Korea. Christopher Reno is based in Galesburg, IL and studied Painting, Drawing, and Printmaking at the University of Iowa, Knox College, and the New York Studio School. His work has been exhibited nationally in New York, Austin, and St. Louis.

Chris Reno, OOO
Christopher Reno, 000, watercolor on handmade flax, 22 x 15 inches

Piecing It Together will be on view March 31st through May 28th and open during regular Hamon library hours: M-Th 8 – 12 a.m., F 8 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sat 12 – 5 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. – 12 a.m. For more information, please call 214-768-3813 or visit www.smu.edu/cul/hamon.

Feature image: Mary Laube, Willow, watercolor on paper, 7 x 7 inches
Blog post: Courtesy of Georgia Erger
Images: Courtesy of Mary Laube, Christopher Reno, and Galleri Urbane

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