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Exhibitions

ARK: Q&A with Filmmaker Mike Morris

 

This week’s blog post features an interview between curator, Emily Rueggeberg, and filmmaker, Mike Morris, the creator of ARK. ARK is on view in the Hawn Gallery now through November 4, 2018.

 

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Emily Rueggeberg: What draws you to the experimental film format as opposed to traditional films?

Mike Morris: Moving images are an amazingly open group of technologies that have been interpreted pretty narrowly if you think about the formal approach of the film industry. Experimental film is a tradition that opens cinema to these expanded possibilities. That’s not to say that there isn’t plenty of meaningful work to be done within more traditional forms, but cinema doesn’t necessarily need to be a strictly illusionistic storytelling medium. When you’re working with film, you’re working with a physical, photo-chemical, and mechanical medium that can be manipulated to create many kinds of images in a highly formalized or improvisational manner.

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Hawn Gallery presents: ARK: Featuring New Experimental 35 MM Film by Mike Morris

The Hawn Gallery presents

 ARK

Featuring a New Experimental Film by Mike Morris

 

On view: August 20 – November 4, 2018
at the Hawn Gallery, located in the Hamon Arts Library at SMU

Public Opening Reception Friday, September 14, 5 -7pm
Mike Morris will give a gallery talk at 5:45 pm

ARK is a cinematic installation featuring a film by Michael A. Morris made from archival 35mm film prints held in the G. William Jones Film and Video Collection. This work is installed on a looping film system devised by the Collection’s Jeremy Spracklen and Scott Martin, and in conjunction with Brad Miller from Film-Tech Cinema Systems. The looping film is a new mosaic of images and sounds created by contact printing and hand processing of short lengths of films selected from the archive. Highlighting the mechanics of projection typically hidden from the viewer, the space of the Hawn Gallery performs as a small cinema. The metaphor of both Noah’s Ark and the Ark of the Covenant serves as a parallel for the archive as it rescues hundreds of films from the deluge of time. These films are reactivated by bringing them back into the light and onto the screen in a new looping film installation. Such assemblage embodies our cinematic heritage.

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Curatorial Discussion #1 Psychology and Color in Constance Lowe’s Work

Manifold Projection 1

Manifold Projection 1, 2012
archival inkjet print on watercolor paper #1 of 3
24 x 19 inches

This following post is first in a series of blog posts about the Hawn Gallery’s exhibition Chromarray, with works by Constance Lowe. Throughout the exhibition, Emily Rueggeberg, the Hawn Gallery Curatorial Fellow, will post about the artwork and themes present in the exhibition. This post focuses on the significance of abstraction and psychology in Lowe’s series, Fabcom/Chromarray and Garden City (Air to Ground).

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THE HAWN GALLERY PRESENTS: CHROMARRAY

Garden City #1 (Flyover).jpg

CHROMARRAY

Works by Constance Lowe

On view: April 6 – May 27, 2018 

Opening Reception: Friday, April 6th, 5-7pm

at the Hawn Gallery, located in the Hamon Arts Library at SMU

Artist Connie Lowe will conduct a gallery talk at 5:45 p.m.

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Softissue 2, 2008 Hand-sewn wool felt 98.5 x 62 x 6 inches

 

The Hawn Gallery presents Chromarray, works by Constance Lowe, featuring pieces from Lowe’s Garden City (Air to Ground), FabCom and Chromarray series.

Lowe’s work examines the intersection between nature and humans’ built environments, with a special focus on biology, mathematics, psychology and agriculture. The title of the show comes from a term created by Lowe – Chromarray. It stems from telescopic research being conducted by Lowe’s friend at the time of the series’ creation. Lowe describes how, across the United States, there are an array of telescopes picking up satellite imagery and radio waves from space. Lowe combined the word chrome, relating to color, with array, and arrangement of objects, to create chromarray.

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Curatorial Discussion #2: Julie Morel’s Reloaded (2017)

The following is the final curatorial discussion in a series of blog posts on the Hawn Gallery exhibition, Clear, Deep, Dark. This week’s piece explores Julie Morel’s print Reloaded (2017).

In the exhibition, Clear, Deep, Dark, when one enters the gallery your eyes meet illuminated pieces mounted onto each of the four walls. The pinpoints of light appear randomly scattered across the paper’s surface. The lights embedded in the matte black paper of the IP and GPS series appear to be coming from a distance, such as the light we see from stars, reaching us only years later. The pieces on the back wall referencing Darknet acronyms are also lit. They differ in that the LEDs surrounding the letters overwhelm and consume their host with blinding white light, making them difficult to look at directly. Once you approach the works in each series, subtler symbols, numbers, and letters become clear. The IP series contains silk-screened IP addresses using conductive ink, referencing places where Julie Morel has placed files of artwork on private computers, printed in blocky letters reminiscent of computer circuits. The GPS series is also composed of silk screen printed numbers and letters using conductive ink. These figures refer to GPS coordinates where Morel has placed physical objects of her own, locatable through satellite imagery, but inaccessible due to their remote or private locations.[1]

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Installation view of Clear, Deep, Dark with Morel’s Reloaded (2017) and IP series

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Curatorial discussion #1: Clear, Deep, Dark

This curatorial discussion on the Hawn Gallery exhibition, Clear, Deep, Dark, focuses on its artist, Julie Morel. Every two weeks during the exhibition’s run, Curatorial Fellow, Emily Rueggeberg, will post a new article highlighting one or more of Morel’s pieces from the exhibition to provide insight into the artist’s creative and theoretical processes.

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Bywaters Special Collections Artist Profile: Mary Frances Doyle

Featured in the exhibition Texas Women Artists: Selections from Bywaters Special Collections, on the 2nd floor of Hamon Arts Library.

Mary Frances Doyle (1904 – 2000) was known as both a dedicated art teacher and an outstanding printmaker, particularly with the silk-screen, or serigraph, technique. Doyle was born in Stephenville, Texas to Davis K. Doyle, a Texas newspaperman, and his wife. Doyle lived most of her adult life with her parents in Arlington, Texas. In 1930 she earned her Bachelors of Art degree from Southwest Texas State Teachers’ College in San Marcos, Texas. She liked to recall one of her fellow classmates, Lyndon Baines Johnson, also working his way through school, sweeping out the classroom where she taught a demonstration kindergarten group. The future US president would ask her opinion on particular political issues and then listen to her views while continuing to swing his broom. In 1939 Doyle moved to Teachers College, Columbia University, in New York, where she studied with Charles J. Martin, and in 1948 earned a Master of Arts degree from Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas. She also studied with distinguished Texas artists including Otis Dozier and Octavio Medellin at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts school, and Xavier Gonzales at Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas.

In 1935 Doyle began a 37-year long teaching career in the Dallas Independent School District teaching art at the Alamo, Thomas Edison, and City Park schools. Dedicated to her career and to her students, Doyle’s strove to develop the artistic ability of each child regardless of financial background. In addition, she was active in the Dallas Art Education Club, serving as its president during the late 1940s and early 1950s. Doyle was instrumental in helping to organize children’s exhibitions at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts where she worked as an instructor at various times during the 1940s through the early 1970s. When not teaching or working on her art, Doyle enjoyed collecting Latin American crafts.

A prolific artist, mainly as a printmaker, Doyle was active in exhibiting her work in galleries, museums, and with the Texas Printmakers organization (formerly the Printmakers Guild). In 1940 her oil painting Water Front was included in the Eleventh Annual Allied Arts Exhibition at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, now the Dallas Museum of Art. During the 1950s Doyle’s prints were accepted into major exhibitions. In 1955 her print Texas Oranges was exhibited in the Audubon Artists 13th Annual Exhibition at the National Academy Galleries in New York. Two of her serigraphs were accepted in the Southwestern Exhibition of Prints and Drawings exhibitions sponsored by the Dallas Print Society at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts: Honeydew Melon (6th Southwestern Exhibition of Prints and Drawings, 1956) and Cactus in Bloom (9th Southwestern Exhibition of Prints and Drawings, 1959). In 1958 Cactus in Bloom won “Best Serigraph in Show” at the Print Fair conducted by Creative Graphics at Burr Galleries in New York City and was accepted into the Boston Printmakers 11th Annual Print Exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. In the same year she had a solo exhibition sponsored by the Texas Fine Arts Association at the Laguna Gloria Art Museum in Austin, Texas, and a year later was included in the show Postwar Prints: 1946 – 1959 at the Dallas Museum for Contemporary Arts. In 1960 Doyle was again accepted into the Boston Printmakers’ 13th Annual Print Exhibition with her serigraph Twin Mountains. Doyle’s work was represented from the 1950s through the 1970s in distinguished Dallas galleries including the Black Tulip Gallery, Downtown Galleries, and Cushing Galleries. In February, 1960, her work was accepted into the Philadelphia Second Annual Print Fair. Thirty years later Mary Doyle and her contemporaries were honored in the exhibition The Texas Printmakers, at the Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University. Mary Doyle died on Sept. 5, 2000 in Denton, Texas.


Image: Century Plant, Serigraph, 1961, original dimensions (image):  29 ¾” (H) x 11” (W)

Courtesy of Mary Doyle Collection, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collective Practice: Community Building Through Zines – Curatorial discussion of Selected Works

The Hawn Gallery’s current exhibition, Collective Practice: Community Building Through Zines, had a brisk turnout at its opening reception on October 20th and continues to draw many visitors to its installation. At the opening, members of Puro Chingón Collective – Claudia Zapata, James Huizar, and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi – discussed the origin of their zine, Chingozine, and provided some context for their work. Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery, Emily Rueggeberg, selected pieces from the exhibition for a more in-depth discussion of these works.

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Hawn Gallery Presents: Collective Practice: Community Building through Zines – Works by Puro Chingón Collective

The Hawn Gallery presents

Collective Practice: Community Building Through Zines
Works by Puro Chingón Collective

On view: October 20 – December 15, 2017

 Opening Reception: Friday, October 20th, 5-7pm
at the Hawn Gallery, located in the Hamon Arts Library at SMU

Artists Claudia Zapata, James Huizar, and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi will conduct a gallery talk at the opening at 5:45 p.m.

Puro Chingón Collective is comprised of James Huizar, Claudia Zapata and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi. The Collective formed after they began publishing their zine, ChingoZine, a publication dedicated to showing works by Latinx artists. Zines are short for magazines, but rather than ones seen on newsstands, they are noncommercial, homemade, or online publications containing subject matter that reflects the community in which they are created. The Collective’s practice is one rooted in social practice and engages with people in public spaces through murals, film screenings, and parties. The public events are largely hosted in Austin and focus on celebrating Latinx arts and culture through film screenings and interactive events. During the film events, members are given props so they can participate with movies such as Mi Vida Loca, Y Tu Mama Tambien and Selena.

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