Search

Blog of the Hamon Arts Library

Category

Exhibitions

Hawn Gallery Presents: Collective Practice: Community Building through Zines – Works by Puro Chingón Collective

The Hawn Gallery presents

Collective Practice: Community Building Through Zines
Works by Puro Chingón Collective

On view: October 20 – December 15, 2017

 Opening Reception: Friday, October 20th, 5-7pm
at the Hawn Gallery, located in the Hamon Arts Library at SMU

Artists Claudia Zapata, James Huizar, and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi will conduct a gallery talk at the opening at 5:45 p.m.

Puro Chingón Collective is comprised of James Huizar, Claudia Zapata and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi. The Collective formed after they began publishing their zine, ChingoZine, a publication dedicated to showing works by Latinx artists. Zines are short for magazines, but rather than ones seen on newsstands, they are noncommercial, homemade, or online publications containing subject matter that reflects the community in which they are created. The Collective’s practice is one rooted in social practice and engages with people in public spaces through murals, film screenings, and parties. The public events are largely hosted in Austin and focus on celebrating Latinx arts and culture through film screenings and interactive events. During the film events, members are given props so they can participate with movies such as Mi Vida Loca, Y Tu Mama Tambien and Selena.

Continue reading “Hawn Gallery Presents: Collective Practice: Community Building through Zines – Works by Puro Chingón Collective”

The Hawn Gallery presents Embodied Algorithm: [Re]embracing the Analog –New works by Ira Greenberg

The Hawn Gallery presents

Embodied Algorithm: [Re]embracing the Analog

New works by Ira Greenberg

On view: September 8 – October 8, 2017

 Opening Reception: Friday, September 8th, 5-7 pm
at the Hawn Gallery, located in the Hamon Arts Library at SMU

Artist Ira Greenberg will conduct a gallery talk at 5:45 p.m.

18589153_10103817714601208_7760609856045532486_o (1)
Despair, Benighted States of America Series, charcoal on paper, 42″ x 46″ 2017

An exhibition of new works by Dallas-based artist Ira Greenberg features drawings completed over a two-year period exploring the continuum between computational (digital) and human- (analog) implemented algorithms. The ultimate pieces confront viewers with large-scale snapshots of intimate moments between Greenberg’s subjects.

Below Greenberg discusses his shift to drawing and describes how the analog process helps create deep connections between the artist and viewer, bridging time and space.

Creating a drawing is a multi-layered, integrative problem, very difficult for a computer. Algorithms are quite good at mimicking parts of a drawing process, such as creating a contour line, shading, or even utilizing advanced AI techniques to generate a composition. However, drawings are profoundly idiosyncratic creations, each mark a near (or far) miss, determined by complex overlapping dynamics. An artist’s intellectual, physical and emotional states factor into every mark and decision made. In this sense a drawing is like a time machine, capturing the temporal experience of the artist’s process. Though algorithms can simulate these dynamics with layers of clever randomization, the decisions are ultimately not connected to a human life (though in theory they could be connected to one in silico.)

For me, one of the most captivating features of a work of art is the artist’s hand/intention and the communication felt between artist and viewer, across time and space. Though at first glance this communication might seem unidirectional–from artist to viewer–complex, highly layered works of art–a Cezanne landscape, a highly glazed Titian, a built-up impasto-ed Rembrandt self-portrait–have so many layers of captured meaning that upon multiple viewings the work/artist continues a conversation with the viewer.

The drawings in this show grew out of an analog process considering the translation of computational algorithms, based on some of my earlier code structures. The early pieces began as automatic drawings, with found form and structures emerging over time. This process led eventually to head-like, abstract forms emerging, which then slowly evolved to highly representational heads, based on source material. I never intended to draw portraits. However, once the representational heads emerged, I began to consider the internal algorithms imbued in the process of creating the drawing. Though I am interested in the pictorial narrative vis-à-vis the imagery, I am equally interested in other formal properties, including composition, scale and activation of the surface, through orchestration of marks and tonality. Overall, as with the original algorithmic work, I am still searching for form and structures through my process; though the outcome is now far more layered and deeply personal.

18768493_10103848441554148_8310652783126325825_o
Hilary & Jerry, charcoal on paper, 65″ x 42″ 2017

Greenberg’s art practice spans painting, 2D and 3D animation, print design, and web and interactive design. He is the Director of the Center of Creative Computation and Professor at SMU, with a joint appointment in the Meadows School of the Arts and the Lyle School of Engineering.

Embodied Algorithm: [Re]embracing the Analog will be on view until October 8th. The gallery is open daily, M-TH 8AM-9PM, F 8AM-6PM, Sat 12PM-5PM, Sun 2PM-9PM and free to the public. The artwork will extend out of the Hawn Gallery and into the Hamon Arts Library’s lobby to include works from the artist’s algorithmic drawing series. For more information, please call 214-768-3813 or visit http://www.smu.edu/cul/hamon.


Featured image: Robin & Sophie, charcoal on paper, 72″ x 48″ 2017
Images: courtesy of Ira Greenberg

Hawn Gallery presents Piecing It Together

The Hawn Gallery presents:

 Piecing It Together

Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube & Christopher Reno

On view March 31 – May 28, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday, April 7th from 6-8 p.m.
at the Hawn Gallery, Hamon Arts Library

Danielle Kimzey - Stars in Her Eyes
Danielle Kimzey, Stars in Her Eyes, gouache on panel, 16 x 16 inches

Piecing It Together features works by Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube, and Christopher Reno. These three painters share an interest in exploring the private world of the ‘home’ and seek to demystify, through their abstract works, this often insular, domestic space. This collected body of work draws upon the artists’ experiences of parenthood and memories of home, and brings to the forefront that which is often considered banal or overly sentimental. All three artists employ a wide range of mediums in their painting practices and rigorously examine diverse modernist and contemporary techniques and ideologies.

Piecing It Together is curated by Georgia Erger, the Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery. An Opening Reception will be held in the gallery on Friday, April 7th from 6-8 p.m. wherein artists, Danielle Kimzey and Christopher Reno will conduct a gallery talk.

Danielle Kimzey is based in Dallas and studied Painting and Drawing at the University of Iowa and Southern Methodist University. Her work has been exhibited nationally in Dallas, Memphis, and Irvine and internationally in Berlin. Mary Laube is based in Cleveland and studied Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture at the University of Iowa and Illinois State University. Her work has been exhibited nationally in Dallas, New York, and Philadelphia and internationally in Gimpo, South Korea. Christopher Reno is based in Galesburg, IL and studied Painting, Drawing, and Printmaking at the University of Iowa, Knox College, and the New York Studio School. His work has been exhibited nationally in New York, Austin, and St. Louis.

Chris Reno, OOO
Christopher Reno, 000, watercolor on handmade flax, 22 x 15 inches

Piecing It Together will be on view March 31st through May 28th and open during regular Hamon library hours: M-Th 8 – 12 a.m., F 8 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sat 12 – 5 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. – 12 a.m. For more information, please call 214-768-3813 or visit www.smu.edu/cul/hamon.

Feature image: Mary Laube, Willow, watercolor on paper, 7 x 7 inches
Blog post: Courtesy of Georgia Erger
Images: Courtesy of Mary Laube, Christopher Reno, and Galleri Urbane

Pictorial: R3clamation: Routes & Roots – exhibition opening Oct. 28th


Images by Mariza Morin

Hawn Gallery presents R3clamation: Routes & Roots, An Installation by Basil Kincaid

The Hawn Gallery presents:

R3clamation: Routes & Roots, An Installation by Basil Kincaid

[If the map to freedom was etched on the inside of your forehead, would you carve back the skin and follow the route to your roots?]

On view October 28th – December 11th, 2016

Opening Reception: Friday, October 28th from 6-8 p.m. at the Hawn Gallery, Hamon Arts Library Continue reading “Hawn Gallery presents R3clamation: Routes & Roots, An Installation by Basil Kincaid”

GCI online exhibition – Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings

The Bywaters Special Collections staff are happy to announce that SMU’s Central University Libraries is now a part of the Google Cultural Institute. BSC staff, Ellen Buie Niewyk, curated the first GCI exhibition with archivist, Emily George Grubbs. Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings, 1938 is an exhibition curated from the holdings of photographs and documents of the artist from Bywaters Special Collections. Take a look!


Thank you to Emily George Grubbs, Archivist, Bywaters Special Collections, for this post!

Image: Courtesy of Octavio Medellin Art work and Papers, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

DeForrest Judd, Sketches of Texas Regions – Big Bend, Caddo Lake, Gulf Coast

DeForrest H. Judd, a native of Hartsgrove, Ohio, lived most of his life in Dallas working as an artist and teaching at Southern Methodist University.  Judd’s keen observation of everyday life and nature influenced him to paint, draw, and print his interpretations onto canvas, paper, and copper enamels.  As a professional artist and teacher, Judd taught numerous students at SMU and summer workshops in Arkansas, New Mexico, and Texas. Continue reading “DeForrest Judd, Sketches of Texas Regions – Big Bend, Caddo Lake, Gulf Coast”

Meet Georgia Erger, Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery at Hamon

Georgia Erger is Hamon’s first Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery. She joined the staff last month at the beginning of July 2016. As Curatorial Fellow, she is responsible for much of the work in the Hawn Gallery, including development and installation of three exhibitions for the fall and spring semesters, publicity, and archival management of the gallery’s exhibition history. Previous to coming to Hamon, Georgia was Program Assistant, John B. Aird Gallery, and the Windgate Postgraduate Intern in Museum Studies at the Baum Gallery of Fine Art, University of Central Arkansas. Georgia completed her BA in art history at the University of Toronto, University College, and her MA at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London. We are thrilled to have her. Let’s get to know her better… Continue reading “Meet Georgia Erger, Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery at Hamon”

Carlotta Corpron: Photography and Light

Artist and educator, Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) is the subject of one of the current exhibitions at the Meadows Museum.  Process and Innovation:  Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner, on view through June 5, 2016, presents the art of two women who worked as both artists and professors at separate Texan universities during the twentieth century.   Highly experimental, both artists would come into their maturity of style in their respective media of photography and printmaking while teaching in Texas. Continue reading “Carlotta Corpron: Photography and Light”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑