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Janet Turner: Texas Printmaker

The current exhibition at Meadows Museum at SMU, Process and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner, is a welcome reminder of earlier showings of Janet Turner’s prints in Dallas and elsewhere in Texas.  Don’t miss Turner’s remarkable prints now on loan from Hamon’s Bywaters Special Collections, along with other private lenders, including Jack and Beverly Wilgus -donors who have generously pledged their historic photographic collection to DeGolyer Library. Images by Beverly Wilgus, a former student of Corpron, will also be on view.

Continue reading “Janet Turner: Texas Printmaker”

David Bowie as art critic

Following the announcement of David Bowie’s death in January, a number of memorials have been published praising and critiquing the singer’s other contributions in the arts.  Indeed, he was not just a cultural icon involved in music, fashion, film, and theater; in the 1990s, he also wrote about contemporary art.

Continue reading “David Bowie as art critic”

Write for the Blog of the Hamon Arts Library!

Submissions to the Hamon blog are accepted year round. We welcome submissions from students, faculty, staff, and those from the broader Dallas community. Examples of submissions include: Continue reading “Write for the Blog of the Hamon Arts Library!”

Ed Bland: American urban classical composer

Several years ago when I was brainstorming for a doctoral performance project, I knew that I wanted to deal with something that had to deal with African-American composers.  This was because through all my studies I found that black composers were seldom represented in the classroom and on the performance stage.  After some initial research I came across the works of Ed Bland mostly because it seemed he had many compositions for clarinet (my instrument).  After acquiring his album Urban Classical, I became fascinated by the music I was listening to and decided to focus my research on him. Continue reading “Ed Bland: American urban classical composer”

Rereading Argos as an Index of Imperiled Selfhood Among Returning Combat Veterans

 

In a memorable scene set in a hotel room in the film, Apocalypse Now, Captain Benjamin Willard, experiencing a fit of delirium, smashes a mirror with his fist and then smears the blood from his wounded hand on his face. The interrelated themes of transformation and recognition introduced in this scene, through the symbol of the mirror and the blood-obscured visage, appear in ancient art as they do throughout western popular culture, underscoring the significance of the transformative effects of war on the body and the psyche of the individual.

Continue reading “Rereading Argos as an Index of Imperiled Selfhood Among Returning Combat Veterans”

Write for the Blog of the Hamon Arts Library!

Submissions to the Hamon blog are accepted year round. We welcome submissions from students, faculty, staff, and those from the broader Dallas community. Examples of submissions include: Continue reading “Write for the Blog of the Hamon Arts Library!”

Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson – an Introduction

SuitorsofIthaca

This posting on the exhibition, Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson, which opened in the Hawn Gallery of the Hamon Arts Library on January 25th, is the first of several postings by the artist. This posting presents a summary of the exhibition. This and future postings are intended as a series of dialogs between the artist and the community viewing and reading about the exhibition, and the artist invites comments from readers.

Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson is on view through May 16th, and the Gallery is accessible during the Library’s open hours (Hamon calendar).

Continue reading “Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson – an Introduction”

Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015): American abstract artist

Learning of the death of Ellsworth Kelly reminded me of the first time I viewed one of his works. The occasion was the Metropolitan Museum’s centennial exhibition, ‘New York Painting and Sculpture: 1940–1970’, curated by Henry Geldzahler when he was but 33 years old. The exhibition displayed 408 works by 43 artists whom Geldzahler identified as the key innovators of post-war art in New York. Geldzahler’s exhibition was an epic proclamation on American culture in the middle decades of the twentieth century. And it was encyclopaedic, exhibiting works from Abstract Expressionism to Pop. It was the first exhibition of its kind at the venerable Met and it was, from my perspective, an epiphany.

Continue reading “Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015): American abstract artist”

Pictorial: Meadows singers learn from masters Jake Heggie, Joyce DiDonato, and Frederica von Stade

 

Three judges
The master teachers, Jake Heggie, Joyce DiDonato, and Frederica von Stade (from left to right).

On November 3, Mezzo sopranos Joyce DiDonato and Frederica von Stade and composer Jake Heggie took time between performances of Heggie’s opera Great Scott to give a master class for singers in the Division of Music in the Meadows School of the Arts. Five students performed art songs and opera arias for the artists and a sizable audience of fellow music students and faculty. Each performer was then given feedback and comments from Heggie, von Stade, and DiDonato. Here are some of the highlights of the two-hour class. Continue reading “Pictorial: Meadows singers learn from masters Jake Heggie, Joyce DiDonato, and Frederica von Stade”

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