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Interviews

The Illusion of Being: the artists’ interview with Cravens, Faircloth, and Whitt

Thank you to each of you for your willingness to participate in this interview. This exhibition, The Illusion of Being, is a captivating exhibition in the Hawn Gallery and I hope that many more visitors at the university and in the arts community take advantage of seeing it before it closes on May 17th. It has been phenomenal to have this installation in the Hawn Gallery at Hamon.

To begin, each body of work by the three of you has a very strong affiliation with the concept of illusion. Could you discuss how this concept, whether through its creation in photography or other design, served as a lodestar in the development of your work?

Lynné: My work in The Illusion of Being is a culmination of 10 years of research and exploration.  It is hard to say how this work will influence the art I make next, but I can definitely see how I got to this point.  I have been working with origami and photography for quite some time now.  I am interested in how the combination of the two mediums transforms both the image and the form into something new.  With the work in The Illusion of Being, I added another layer with the introduction of the mirror.  I like how the mirror creates a horizon into another dimension, showing a different side and perspective to the objects.  I was also interested in the fact that the viewer could see themselves in the mirror, essentially becoming part of the piece.  This work not only morphs, distorts, and changes my body; but it also incorporates the body of the viewer. 

When creating artworks, I am always translating my emotions and personal experiences into a physical object.  What I am essentially doing is translating what it means to be human into an object.  When Ross suggested the title for the show as The Illusion of Being, I thought it fit perfectly with the concepts all three of us continually make work about.  It really sums up what we do.  These objects are only simulations, they are not the actual experiences.  However, through these objects we can approach these emotions and experiences from a different vantage point.

Continue reading “The Illusion of Being: the artists’ interview with Cravens, Faircloth, and Whitt”

ARK: Q&A with Filmmaker Mike Morris

 

This week’s blog post features an interview between curator, Emily Rueggeberg, and filmmaker, Mike Morris, the creator of ARK. ARK is on view in the Hawn Gallery now through November 4, 2018.

 

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Emily Rueggeberg: What draws you to the experimental film format as opposed to traditional films?

Mike Morris: Moving images are an amazingly open group of technologies that have been interpreted pretty narrowly if you think about the formal approach of the film industry. Experimental film is a tradition that opens cinema to these expanded possibilities. That’s not to say that there isn’t plenty of meaningful work to be done within more traditional forms, but cinema doesn’t necessarily need to be a strictly illusionistic storytelling medium. When you’re working with film, you’re working with a physical, photo-chemical, and mechanical medium that can be manipulated to create many kinds of images in a highly formalized or improvisational manner.

Continue reading “ARK: Q&A with Filmmaker Mike Morris”

Meet Alice Bidault, Dijon Fellow from ENSA

In August, Meadows School of the Arts hosted the Second Annual “From Dijon to Dallas” Exhibition, which featured the work of two fellows selected in a six-week exchange program. This year, the fellows were Andrew Davis (SMU MFA ’16) and Alice Bidault from Dijon. Dijon and Dallas are sister cities, and the program was established last year between the two schools, Meadows and the École Nationale Supérieure d’Art (ENSA). The exhibition opened at Liliana Bloch Gallery on August 23rd and closes on September 3rd. In October, both Andrew and Alice will launch a joint exhibition in Dijon.

Below is Alice’s interview about her work, and experience in Dallas and at SMU. It follows as the blog’s second one from last year’s Dijon fellow, Hugo Capron.
Continue reading “Meet Alice Bidault, Dijon Fellow from ENSA”

Meet Georgia Erger, Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery at Hamon

Georgia Erger is Hamon’s first Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery. She joined the staff last month at the beginning of July 2016. As Curatorial Fellow, she is responsible for much of the work in the Hawn Gallery, including development and installation of three exhibitions for the fall and spring semesters, publicity, and archival management of the gallery’s exhibition history. Previous to coming to Hamon, Georgia was Program Assistant, John B. Aird Gallery, and the Windgate Postgraduate Intern in Museum Studies at the Baum Gallery of Fine Art, University of Central Arkansas. Georgia completed her BA in art history at the University of Toronto, University College, and her MA at the Courtauld Institute of Art, London. We are thrilled to have her. Let’s get to know her better… Continue reading “Meet Georgia Erger, Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery at Hamon”

Meet Mariza Morin, Stacks Manager

Mariza Morin joined the Hamon Arts Library at the beginning of Fall 2015. Since then, she has spearheaded large projects that have improved the orderliness of library collections. Mariza’s work is like pruning plants to keep them healthy and productive, and we’re very happy to have her. Let’s get to know her a bit better, shall we? Continue reading “Meet Mariza Morin, Stacks Manager”

Some assembly required: Interview with artist Ryan Goolsby

Hamon’s newest update to its lobby is a pair of customized computer kiosks that were designed and built by Meadows staff member, Ryan Goolsby. We interviewed Ryan about his position at SMU, his work as an artist, and the process for creating these kiosks.

Continue reading “Some assembly required: Interview with artist Ryan Goolsby”

Meet Jeremy Spracklen, Film Preservation Technician

 

Jeremy Spracklen is the Film Preservation Technician for the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection at the Hamon Arts Library. He received his undergraduate degrees in History and Philosophy and recently earned his MA in History – all from the University of Texas at Arlington. Additionally, Jeremy is the Projectionist at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth as well as the Traverse City and Telluride Film Festivals. Furthermore, he has served as the Technical Director for the USA Film Festival since 2002. In addition to his technical duties for film festivals, Jeremy has also put together commissioned tributes for visiting actors and directors, including Rob Reiner, Ed Harris, Carol Kane, Wes Anderson and Malcolm McDowell. Spracklen also recently presented his thesis Cinema I & II: A History of the Movies in Dallas as Seen through NorthPark’s Iconic Theater at this year’s Dallas VideoFest and also recently worked with 70mm Ultra Panavision format in Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming film The Hateful Eight. Continue reading “Meet Jeremy Spracklen, Film Preservation Technician”

The travels of The Blood of Jesus

One of the most significant of the Tyler Race Films is The Blood of Jesus, written by and starring Spencer Williams.  As with many of Williams’ films, this is a study of the continuing conflict between good and evil, holiness and godlessness, church and juke joint.  Williams filmed it with a largely amateur cast and with a minimal budget in 1941 for distribution to the 1200 or so movie houses that catered to all-black audiences at that time.   Despite the limitations imposed by its restrictively small budget, “The Blood of Jesus” was a financial success. Continue reading “The travels of The Blood of Jesus”

Division of Dance concert programs now online

Best of Meadows Dance 2006
Program for “The Best of Meadows Dance” concert, April 28-30, 2006 from the Division of Dance Concert Programs and Materials in the SMU Digital Collections.

Hamon Arts Library is excited to make the Division of Dance Concert Programs and Materials available online in the SMU Digital Collections. The library worked closely with the Division of Dance in the Meadows School of the Arts and the Digital Collections to bring this collection to a global audience. The programs illuminate the Division’s history dating back to the late 1960s. I interviewed Patty Harrington Delaney, Chair of the Division of Dance, about the importance of making the collection available online. Continue reading “Division of Dance concert programs now online”

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