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Bob Dylan Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature

The news seemed so odd – what relevance does Bob Dylan have now? Is his work literature?  Which work, or works, merit this prize? If the prize is in recognition of a body of work, where is the corpus? The collection?

What does Dylan mean to those interested in what was, at least in the past, known as the fine arts? How is his work different from the horde of largely forgotten singers and songwriters, back to the Brill Building and Tin Pan Alley? Continue reading “Bob Dylan Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature”

GCI online exhibition – Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings

The Bywaters Special Collections staff are happy to announce that SMU’s Central University Libraries is now a part of the Google Cultural Institute. BSC staff, Ellen Buie Niewyk, curated the first GCI exhibition with archivist, Emily George Grubbs. Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings, 1938 is an exhibition curated from the holdings of photographs and documents of the artist from Bywaters Special Collections. Take a look!


Thank you to Emily George Grubbs, Archivist, Bywaters Special Collections, for this post!

Image: Courtesy of Octavio Medellin Art work and Papers, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

Open Access Week in October

Central University Libraries and Southern Methodist University present and invite you to Open Access Week 2016 at Southern Methodist University

Open Access Week at SMU will take place on October 24 – 28, 2016, in the Fondren Library. Three speakers will be highlighted in the Foyer of the Fondren Library on Oct 25, 26 and 28 and an informational table will be placed in the Collaborative Commons area,
Monday through Friday from 11am to 2pm. Continue reading “Open Access Week in October”

Strange inheritance

In the spring of 2009, I received a telephone call from Atlee Phillips, Texas art specialist at Dallas’s Heritage Auction Galleries.  Although I’d never met Atlee, she told me that I’d soon think of her as “my new best friend.”  A few days later, she arrived in my office with numerous photographs of a painting of the Battle of San Jacinto by Texas painter Henry Arthur McArdle (1836-1908).  Although I knew that this painting had been executed in 1901, I had assumed it to have been destroyed in a fire and had stated as much in a footnote in my 1992 book, Painting Texas History to 1900.  But Atlee’s photographs, taken by members of McArdle’s family, who owned the house in West Virginia where the painting had been stored in an attic since the 1950s, proved me wrong (fortunately).  In November 2010, Heritage auctioned the painting, which was purchased by a private collector in Texas. Continue reading “Strange inheritance”

Hamon staff appointment to Dallas Historical Society Board

Congratulations are in order for Dr. Sam Ratcliffe, Head of Bywaters Special Collections, who was recently appointed to the board of trustees of the Dallas Historical Society. A long-standing non-profit organization, since 1922, the Society has, according to its mission, sought to collect, preserve, and exhibit collections relevant to the heritage of the city. Dr. Ratcliffe brings his more than twenty years of experience overseeing the Special Collections at Hamon, and knowledge of Texas art and history – subjects in which he has frequently published and presented – to the board. Continue reading “Hamon staff appointment to Dallas Historical Society Board”

Pioneers of African-American Cinema

Kino Lorber recently released Pioneers of African-American Cinema, a five DVD set with extensive film notes.  An announcement of the collection’s release appeared in The New York Times (August 10, 2016), in which the film critic, J. Hoberman, stated that “there has never been a more significant video release” in cinema history.  This set includes films discovered and collected by the late SMU professor G. William Jones, which are part of the Tyler, Texas “race films” in the collection. It includes approximately 20 hours of feature films, shorts, interviews, trailers, and fragments.  Many of these films have only been circulated and seen in 16mm versions of inferior quality or have never been available for home video.  Each film has been digitally restored and reflects a wide-range of subject matter and styles.  Accompanying the set is an 80-page booklet with contributions from scholars.

Continue reading “Pioneers of African-American Cinema”

Good luck to our graduating students assistants!

The staff at the Hamon Arts Library have had the privilege of working with many SMU student assistants at  Hamon.  This year, many of our best and brightest are graduating and moving on to bigger and better things:

Continue reading “Good luck to our graduating students assistants!”

Pictorial: Meadows singers learn from masters Jake Heggie, Joyce DiDonato, and Frederica von Stade

 

Three judges
The master teachers, Jake Heggie, Joyce DiDonato, and Frederica von Stade (from left to right).

On November 3, Mezzo sopranos Joyce DiDonato and Frederica von Stade and composer Jake Heggie took time between performances of Heggie’s opera Great Scott to give a master class for singers in the Division of Music in the Meadows School of the Arts. Five students performed art songs and opera arias for the artists and a sizable audience of fellow music students and faculty. Each performer was then given feedback and comments from Heggie, von Stade, and DiDonato. Here are some of the highlights of the two-hour class. Continue reading “Pictorial: Meadows singers learn from masters Jake Heggie, Joyce DiDonato, and Frederica von Stade”

Some assembly required: Interview with artist Ryan Goolsby

Hamon’s newest update to its lobby is a pair of customized computer kiosks that were designed and built by Meadows staff member, Ryan Goolsby. We interviewed Ryan about his position at SMU, his work as an artist, and the process for creating these kiosks.

Continue reading “Some assembly required: Interview with artist Ryan Goolsby”

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