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Blog of the Hamon Arts Library

Collection Spotlight: Esther Webb Houseman art work and papers

Esther Webb Houseman (1910 – 1992) lived most of her life in Dallas working in the fields of crafts and design. In 1933, with Velma Davis [Dozier], she established the Dallas School of Creative Arts; together they were referred to as “The Lady Blacksmiths.” Their school served as a working and teaching studio and offered instruction primarily in metalsmithing with the addition of other art disciplines including photography, printmaking and creative design. The school was also a social gathering place for Dallas artists during the Great Depression of the 1930s. World War II brought an end to the school due to the shortage of metal, but soon after the war Esther and Velma reestablished their school as the Craft Guild of Dallas, which continues today. The collection includes artwork, clippings, correspondence, documents, photographs, publicity, and published works relating to Esther’s own personal work and that of the Dallas School of Creative Arts and the Craft Guild of Dallas.

Please take a look at the detailed finding aid available through Texas Archival Resources Online here:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00102/smu-00102.html


Image: Courtesy of Esther Webb Houseman art work and papers, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

On View: Piecing It Together

Piecing It Together
Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube & Christopher Reno

On view until May 28th, 2017 in the Hawn Gallery

Piecing It Together presents a selection of abstract paintings and drawings by Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube, and Christopher Reno. These three artists explore the private world of the ‘home’ and seek to demystify, through their abstract works, this insular, domestic space. The artists’ subjects reveal both the contents of the ‘house’ (mundane objects encountered everyday) and associations of ‘home’ (deeply ingrained memories and constructed ideals). These artists draw from their experiences of parenthood and the home, and in doing so, bring to the forefront a view that is uniquely private, yet shared.
Continue reading “On View: Piecing It Together”

Dallas movie theaters & controversy in the 60s and 70s

This post from the WFAA Newsfilm Collection is a series of clips about old movie theaters in Dallas during the sixties and seventies, which were dealing with controversial political and cultural subjects in the community at this time.

Continue reading “Dallas movie theaters & controversy in the 60s and 70s”

Collection Spotlight: Film lobby cards, McCord/Renshaw Collection

 

For the February collection spotlight from the McCord/Renshaw Collection, this collection contains motion picture lobby cards primarily from the early 1930s. The majority of the films in this collection are represented by a complete set (eight 11 x 14″ lobby cards) and include the original envelope in excellent condition. The earliest films in the collection are from the early 1920s and include Camille of Barbary Coast (1925), A Doll’s House (1922), Geared to Go (1924) and The White Sheep (1924). The collection includes lobby cards from several noteworthy films such as The Invisible Man, The Mask of Fu Manchu (1932) and Scarface (1932).

Please take a look at the detailed finding aid available through Texas Archival Resources Online here:

http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/smu/00286/smu-00286.html


Feature image: A Doll’s House (1922), Courtesy of McCord/Renshaw Collection, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

Hawn Gallery presents Piecing It Together

The Hawn Gallery presents:

 Piecing It Together

Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube & Christopher Reno

On view March 31 – May 28, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday, April 7th from 6-8 p.m.
at the Hawn Gallery, Hamon Arts Library

Danielle Kimzey - Stars in Her Eyes
Danielle Kimzey, Stars in Her Eyes, gouache on panel, 16 x 16 inches

Piecing It Together features works by Danielle Kimzey, Mary Laube, and Christopher Reno. These three painters share an interest in exploring the private world of the ‘home’ and seek to demystify, through their abstract works, this often insular, domestic space. This collected body of work draws upon the artists’ experiences of parenthood and memories of home, and brings to the forefront that which is often considered banal or overly sentimental. All three artists employ a wide range of mediums in their painting practices and rigorously examine diverse modernist and contemporary techniques and ideologies.

Piecing It Together is curated by Georgia Erger, the Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery. An Opening Reception will be held in the gallery on Friday, April 7th from 6-8 p.m. wherein artists, Danielle Kimzey and Christopher Reno will conduct a gallery talk.

Danielle Kimzey is based in Dallas and studied Painting and Drawing at the University of Iowa and Southern Methodist University. Her work has been exhibited nationally in Dallas, Memphis, and Irvine and internationally in Berlin. Mary Laube is based in Cleveland and studied Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture at the University of Iowa and Illinois State University. Her work has been exhibited nationally in Dallas, New York, and Philadelphia and internationally in Gimpo, South Korea. Christopher Reno is based in Galesburg, IL and studied Painting, Drawing, and Printmaking at the University of Iowa, Knox College, and the New York Studio School. His work has been exhibited nationally in New York, Austin, and St. Louis.

Chris Reno, OOO
Christopher Reno, 000, watercolor on handmade flax, 22 x 15 inches

Piecing It Together will be on view March 31st through May 28th and open during regular Hamon library hours: M-Th 8 – 12 a.m., F 8 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sat 12 – 5 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. – 12 a.m. For more information, please call 214-768-3813 or visit www.smu.edu/cul/hamon.

Feature image: Mary Laube, Willow, watercolor on paper, 7 x 7 inches
Blog post: Courtesy of Georgia Erger
Images: Courtesy of Mary Laube, Christopher Reno, and Galleri Urbane

An Interview with Hawn Gallery Exhibiting Artist, Dylan Glynn

Dylan Glynn: After Order, After Disorder, now on view at the Hawn Gallery through March 12th, features animated shorts, digital prints, paintings, and works on paper by Toronto-based artist, Dylan Glynn. In the following interview, Dylan discusses the melding of his animation and painting practices, his vision for this body of work and exhibition, and his diverse artistic influences.

Continue reading “An Interview with Hawn Gallery Exhibiting Artist, Dylan Glynn”

On View: Dylan Glynn: After Order, After Disorder

Dylan Glynn: After Order, After Disorder

On view until March 12th, 2017 in the Hawn Gallery

After Order, After Disorder presents a selection of Dylan Glynn’s paintings, works on paper, digital prints, and animated shorts. Glynn, whose practice is rooted in formal life drawing, has developed an ethereal style that captures a fantastical naiveté. Expansive landscapes are sparsely populated by serene, yet impassioned figures struggling to assert their selfhood. Boundaries between bodies and nature are blurred – the rib cage of a figure seamlessly mirrors the veins of a leaf. Lyrical movement, as well as the deft manipulation and layering of color, characterize the diverse array of works on view.

Presented alongside Glynn’s works are historical 19th-century photographs from DeGolyer Library’s special collections that evoke similar themes of nostalgia and yearning for a paradise lost. The swirling forms, flowers, and greenery of Glynn’s Utopia are reminiscent of the lush, perhaps tropical, landscape depicted in the 1898 colored photochrome. The 1860/70s stereographs demonstrate a fascination with dimension and movement beautifully paralleled in the crumpling, decaying plants and thrashing water of Glynn’s animated short, Sister Narcissa.

 

dylan-glynn-land
Land, 11 x 17″, watercolor on paper

Both the early, experimental photographs and Glynn’s works emphasize nuanced relationships between new and traditional media. Distinct brushstrokes and watercolor washes in his digital works exemplify Glynn’s reverence for traditional mediums. These practices distance his work from the conventions of commercial animation and distinguish his fine art practice.

Emotive and rich in narration, this body of work expresses the artist’s quietly optimistic projections for the future, in which he envisions humanity’s return to a harmonious relationship with nature. Glynn posits the question: after fighting for rights through the rise and fall of technology, what will we remember? Will we remember the invisible, yet perceivable peace that was there all along?

dylan-glynn-dreaming-of-flight
Dreaming of Flight, 48 x 48″, acrylic on canvas

Dylan Glynn was born in Toronto, where he currently resides. He studied animation at Sheridan College in Toronto and La Poudrière in Valence, France. Glynn’s work has appeared in Vice Magazine, BOOOOOOOM, The Huffington Post, The Globe and Mail, and the Canadian Broadcasting Company, and has been recognized by the Society of Illustrators, American Illustration and the World Illustration Awards.

Dylan Glynn: After Order, After Disorder is curated by Georgia Erger, Curatorial Fellow for the Hawn Gallery.

Images: Courtesy of Dylan Glynn and Georgia Erger

Interview with Dr. Rick Worland on G. William Jones & the Tyler Black Film Collection

In 1991, UNT Press published a book, Black Cinema Treasures: Lost and Found, by G. William Jones, Professor of Cinema and Video in the Meadows School of the Arts.  The book, which includes a forward by actor and director Ossie Davis, focuses on a rich trove of films created by pioneer African American filmmakers for Black audiences in the 1920s up through the 1950s.  SMU Libraries obtained permission from UNT Press, which owns the copyright, to post a digital copy of the book in the University’s open access repository, SMU Scholar, for the month of February in conjunction with Black History Month.

Professor Rick Worland in the Film & Media Arts Division at SMU knew Professor Jones, who died in 1995. Dr. Worland has also researched and written about films in the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection, and he agreed to an interview with Hamon’s Moving Image Curator, Jeremy Spracklen.

Continue reading “Interview with Dr. Rick Worland on G. William Jones & the Tyler Black Film Collection”

LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION: One Button Studio NOW AVAILABLE in Hamon Arts Library

The staff of the Hamon Arts Library are proud to announce the opening of a personal video recording studio for the SMU community. Utilizing the innovative One Button Studio software, developed by Penn State University, this new service offers an automated and simplified method for the immediate recording of presentations, auditions, or speeches on a USB drive. Any project or topic for an SMU community member can quickly and easily be transformed into a video disseminated through personal websites, social media, and web platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook, blogs, YouTube, and Vimeo.

Here’s how easy it is!

  • Insert the USB drive, and the studio lights and camera automatically turn on with instructions to prompt you to press the one button.
  • A 5-second countdown allows you to step into place before the camera begins recording.
  • When you finish your presentation or practice, press the button to stop the recording. Prompts let you know the recording has been saved to the drive.

The studio is equipped for using a Powerpoint presentation or background slide as an option. A wireless clicker is also available.

More information is available, including how to book the One Button Studio.


Thank you to Jolene de Verges, Director, Hamon Arts Library, for this announcement.
Feature image: Courtesy of DiMitri Higginbotham, SMU student, MADI program.

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