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Panel Discussion – Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming

 

In conjunction with Hamon’s spring 2016 exhibition, Scott Gleeson: Travels in Ithaca, a site-specific art installation in the Library’s Mildred Hawn Gallery and Hamon lobby, the panel discussion, Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming, raises awareness of the sociological implications of war since the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. Experts in veteran advocacy, brain trauma studies, and combat veterans will deliver 10-minute talks followed by a discussion. Local panel participants include: Donna Cranston, Executive Director of Defenders of Freedom (DoF); a US Combat Veteran and DoF client; Christina (Tina) Bass, M.S., LPC, Psychotherapist and PTSD research assistant, UTDallas Center for Brain Health; The panel moderators are Dr. Alicia Meuret, Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the Anxiety and Depression Research Center, Dedman College, SMU; and Scott Gleeson ’09, visual artist.

The panel, organized in conjunction with Scott Gleeson: Travels In Ithaca, is held as part of the Library’s 25th anniversary celebration.

Collection Spotlight: Ann Cushing Gantz papers

Ann Cushing Gantz (1933 – 2012), a Dallas native, achieved distinction as artist, gallery owner, and art instructor. Her gallery, known as “Cushing Galleries,” served as a location for both gallery exhibitions and art classes. Gantz has taken an active role in many Texas and Dallas art organizations including the Texas Printmakers, a women’s printmaking organization, and the Dallas Print and Drawing Society, serving as president of both organizations. The collection includes artwork, clippings, correspondence, documents, ephemera, gallery files, guest books, photographs, publicity, published works, and scrapbooks. Continue reading “Collection Spotlight: Ann Cushing Gantz papers”

Travels in Ithaca – Gallery Talk Notes

On Wednesday, February 9th, Scott Gleeson gave a gallery talk on his exhibition Travels in Ithaca. He spoke broadly about the therapy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and how it informs the works in the exhibition, and artists and groups that shaped his concepts and aesthetics. Following, Gleeson provides his gallery notes from this talk.

Continue reading “Travels in Ithaca – Gallery Talk Notes”

Pictorial: Travels in Ithaca with Scott Gleeson

Continue reading “Pictorial: Travels in Ithaca with Scott Gleeson”

Rereading Argos as an Index of Imperiled Selfhood Among Returning Combat Veterans

 

In a memorable scene set in a hotel room in the film, Apocalypse Now, Captain Benjamin Willard, experiencing a fit of delirium, smashes a mirror with his fist and then smears the blood from his wounded hand on his face. The interrelated themes of transformation and recognition introduced in this scene, through the symbol of the mirror and the blood-obscured visage, appear in ancient art as they do throughout western popular culture, underscoring the significance of the transformative effects of war on the body and the psyche of the individual.

Continue reading “Rereading Argos as an Index of Imperiled Selfhood Among Returning Combat Veterans”

Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson – an Introduction

SuitorsofIthaca

This posting on the exhibition, Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson, which opened in the Hawn Gallery of the Hamon Arts Library on January 25th, is the first of several postings by the artist. This posting presents a summary of the exhibition. This and future postings are intended as a series of dialogs between the artist and the community viewing and reading about the exhibition, and the artist invites comments from readers.

Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson is on view through May 16th, and the Gallery is accessible during the Library’s open hours (Hamon calendar).

Continue reading “Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson – an Introduction”

Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015): American abstract artist

Learning of the death of Ellsworth Kelly reminded me of the first time I viewed one of his works. The occasion was the Metropolitan Museum’s centennial exhibition, ‘New York Painting and Sculpture: 1940–1970’, curated by Henry Geldzahler when he was but 33 years old. The exhibition displayed 408 works by 43 artists whom Geldzahler identified as the key innovators of post-war art in New York. Geldzahler’s exhibition was an epic proclamation on American culture in the middle decades of the twentieth century. And it was encyclopaedic, exhibiting works from Abstract Expressionism to Pop. It was the first exhibition of its kind at the venerable Met and it was, from my perspective, an epiphany.

Continue reading “Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015): American abstract artist”

Reflections on Paper Dolls

Even the most incurious visitor to the Hamon Arts Library cannot have helped but notice the six works posted near the entryway.  These pieces are part of a series entitled “Paper Dolls,” by Colleen Shull (SMU MFA ’11) and Justin Shull (former SMU Division of Art Adjunct Lecturer).  This show, curated by guest curator Shannon Maylath, features pictures from fashion magazines that have been altered, scratched, cut, torn and crumpled…exploded as it were.
The images are recognizable but transformed, altered from their original appearance and context in such a way that the viewer is confronted both with the symbols of fashion and the formal aspects of the images…the colors, the sense of depth, the juxtaposition of the conventions of fashion photography made mysterious by the alterations.   These images are reborn, visible and present in a way the original photographs were not. Continue reading “Reflections on Paper Dolls”

Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings, 1938 on display

Please stop by the second-floor gallery outside of Bywaters Special Collections and view how the portfolio XTOL by Octavio Medellin was researched by the artist in 1938 and later published in 1947 by the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, which preceded the Dallas Museum of Art. Work began in 1938 when Octavio Medellin spent six months studying the Mayan ruins at Chichén Itzá and Uxmal, located on the Yucatán in Mexico, and documented his travels with 181 black and white photographs that he compiled into a scrapbook entitled Maya – Toltec, Temples and Carvings, 1938 [all photographs in the exhibition are reproductions]. Continue reading “Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings, 1938 on display”

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