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Travels in Ithaca: A Guided Tour

Charybdis
Charybdis (EMDR Visual Aid), Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in.

The art exhibition Scott Gleeson: Travels in Ithaca charts an uncertain and perilous itinerary through the spaces of the Hamon Arts Library Foyer, Lobby, and the Mildred Hawn Gallery, calling viewers’ attention to the social costs of warfare as seen through the lens of Homeric myth. Each of the twelve graphic works in this site-specific installation reference significant events in the life of Odysseus leading up to his return to Ithaca and eventual murder at the hands of his illegitimate son Telegonus. Together, the twelve works constitute a theoretical proposition about one possible role abstract image making or architectural ornament might play if creative professionals chose to address veterans’ issues in their practices. The overarching question proposed by the exhibit is, “What is the social role or responsibility of the artist in responding to the social costs of war, promoting cultural memory of historical events, and facilitating the healing process for veterans and communities?” To address this question Travels in Ithaca imagines a very specific problem with psychotraumatology literature on the Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy method: “How shall patients benefit from therapy in the absence of the therapist given the problems with long treatment delays in the VA healthcare system?” Travels in Ithaca posits deploying cheap, modular architectural ornamentation and graphic imagery designed to facilitate the self-administration of the EMDR method within domestic or institutional interiors.

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Janet Turner: Texas Printmaker

The current exhibition at Meadows Museum at SMU, Process and Innovation: Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner, is a welcome reminder of earlier showings of Janet Turner’s prints in Dallas and elsewhere in Texas.  Don’t miss Turner’s remarkable prints now on loan from Hamon’s Bywaters Special Collections, along with other private lenders, including Jack and Beverly Wilgus -donors who have generously pledged their historic photographic collection to DeGolyer Library. Images by Beverly Wilgus, a former student of Corpron, will also be on view.

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David Bowie as art critic

Following the announcement of David Bowie’s death in January, a number of memorials have been published praising and critiquing the singer’s other contributions in the arts.  Indeed, he was not just a cultural icon involved in music, fashion, film, and theater; in the 1990s, he also wrote about contemporary art.

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Making the write moves: Grant writing workshop April 5

This workshop presents organizational steps to help you begin your research for funding sources and craft clear and compelling proposals. Presented by Beverly Mitchell, Art and Dance Librarian. Continue reading “Making the write moves: Grant writing workshop April 5”

Panel Discussion – Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming

 

In conjunction with Hamon’s spring 2016 exhibition, Scott Gleeson: Travels in Ithaca, a site-specific art installation in the Library’s Mildred Hawn Gallery and Hamon lobby, the panel discussion, Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming, raises awareness of the sociological implications of war since the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. Experts in veteran advocacy, brain trauma studies, and combat veterans will deliver 10-minute talks followed by a discussion. Local panel participants include: Donna Cranston, Executive Director of Defenders of Freedom (DoF); a US Combat Veteran and DoF client; Christina (Tina) Bass, M.S., LPC, Psychotherapist and PTSD research assistant, UTDallas Center for Brain Health; The panel moderators are Dr. Alicia Meuret, Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the Anxiety and Depression Research Center, Dedman College, SMU; and Scott Gleeson ’09, visual artist.

The panel, organized in conjunction with Scott Gleeson: Travels In Ithaca, is held as part of the Library’s 25th anniversary celebration.

Collection Spotlight: Ann Cushing Gantz papers

Ann Cushing Gantz (1933 – 2012), a Dallas native, achieved distinction as artist, gallery owner, and art instructor. Her gallery, known as “Cushing Galleries,” served as a location for both gallery exhibitions and art classes. Gantz has taken an active role in many Texas and Dallas art organizations including the Texas Printmakers, a women’s printmaking organization, and the Dallas Print and Drawing Society, serving as president of both organizations. The collection includes artwork, clippings, correspondence, documents, ephemera, gallery files, guest books, photographs, publicity, published works, and scrapbooks. Continue reading “Collection Spotlight: Ann Cushing Gantz papers”

Travels in Ithaca – Gallery Talk Notes

On Wednesday, February 9th, Scott Gleeson gave a gallery talk on his exhibition Travels in Ithaca. He spoke broadly about the therapy of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and how it informs the works in the exhibition, and artists and groups that shaped his concepts and aesthetics. Following, Gleeson provides his gallery notes from this talk.

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Pictorial: Travels in Ithaca with Scott Gleeson

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Rereading Argos as an Index of Imperiled Selfhood Among Returning Combat Veterans

 

In a memorable scene set in a hotel room in the film, Apocalypse Now, Captain Benjamin Willard, experiencing a fit of delirium, smashes a mirror with his fist and then smears the blood from his wounded hand on his face. The interrelated themes of transformation and recognition introduced in this scene, through the symbol of the mirror and the blood-obscured visage, appear in ancient art as they do throughout western popular culture, underscoring the significance of the transformative effects of war on the body and the psyche of the individual.

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