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WFAA Newsfilm Collection: Look what I found this week!

Greetings. My name is Jeremy Spracklen, and I am the moving image curator of the G. William Jones Film and Video Archive inside the Hamon Arts Library. One of my current projects is the digitization of the Library’s WFAA Newsfilm footage spanning from 1960 to 1977. Every other week I’m going to share a set of clips that I’ve found while working on the collection. They may not all be significant about the history of Dallas, but I still find them each fascinating for what they reveal about life in Dallas-Fort Worth 40-50 years ago. Continue reading “WFAA Newsfilm Collection: Look what I found this week!”

Write for the Blog of the Hamon Arts Library!

Submissions to the Hamon blog are accepted year round. We welcome submissions from students, faculty, staff, and those from the broader Dallas community. Examples of submissions include:

  • Interviews with local arts professionals
  • Reviews of materials found in Hamon’s collections
  • Reviews of exhibitions and other arts events around Meadows and Dallas-Fort Worth

See our guide for submissions, and email your contributions or ideas for submissions to hamonblog@smu.edu.

Image by Carine Felgueiras.

Jeff Gordon on his collection of film posters at Hamon

Film historian and collector, Jeff Gordon, has collaborated with Hamon staff on a fall 2016 installation of seven movie posters from his collection. These stunning and brightly-hued posters join an earlier loan of Dorothy Lamour’s Beyond the Blue Horizon poster also on view on the first floor of the Library. In addition to this installation, Mr. Gordon also agreed to the Blog’s invitation to write comments about his early and sustained interest in movies and memorabilia, and the unique context of each poster in the history of mid-20th century American film.
Continue reading “Jeff Gordon on his collection of film posters at Hamon”

DeForrest Judd, Sketches of Texas Regions – Big Bend, Caddo Lake, Gulf Coast

DeForrest H. Judd, a native of Hartsgrove, Ohio, lived most of his life in Dallas working as an artist and teaching at Southern Methodist University.  Judd’s keen observation of everyday life and nature influenced him to paint, draw, and print his interpretations onto canvas, paper, and copper enamels.  As a professional artist and teacher, Judd taught numerous students at SMU and summer workshops in Arkansas, New Mexico, and Texas. Continue reading “DeForrest Judd, Sketches of Texas Regions – Big Bend, Caddo Lake, Gulf Coast”

Strange inheritance

In the spring of 2009, I received a telephone call from Atlee Phillips, Texas art specialist at Dallas’s Heritage Auction Galleries.  Although I’d never met Atlee, she told me that I’d soon think of her as “my new best friend.”  A few days later, she arrived in my office with numerous photographs of a painting of the Battle of San Jacinto by Texas painter Henry Arthur McArdle (1836-1908).  Although I knew that this painting had been executed in 1901, I had assumed it to have been destroyed in a fire and had stated as much in a footnote in my 1992 book, Painting Texas History to 1900.  But Atlee’s photographs, taken by members of McArdle’s family, who owned the house in West Virginia where the painting had been stored in an attic since the 1950s, proved me wrong (fortunately).  In November 2010, Heritage auctioned the painting, which was purchased by a private collector in Texas. Continue reading “Strange inheritance”

Pioneers of African-American Cinema

Kino Lorber recently released Pioneers of African-American Cinema, a five DVD set with extensive film notes.  An announcement of the collection’s release appeared in The New York Times (August 10, 2016), in which the film critic, J. Hoberman, stated that “there has never been a more significant video release” in cinema history.  This set includes films discovered and collected by the late SMU professor G. William Jones, which are part of the Tyler, Texas “race films” in the collection. It includes approximately 20 hours of feature films, shorts, interviews, trailers, and fragments.  Many of these films have only been circulated and seen in 16mm versions of inferior quality or have never been available for home video.  Each film has been digitally restored and reflects a wide-range of subject matter and styles.  Accompanying the set is an 80-page booklet with contributions from scholars.

Continue reading “Pioneers of African-American Cinema”

Inside Out/Outside In: Investigating the implications of the built environment on Veterans diagnosed with combat-related PTSD

panel1
The Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming. PANELISTS: Donna Cranston, Executive Director of Defenders of Freedom; SFC Jody Thompson (RET); Tina Bass, M.S., LPC, Psychotherapist, UT Dallas Center for Brain Health; Christina Donaldson, Interior Design Strategist, Gensler. MODERATORS: Dr. Alicia Meuret, Director, Anxiety and Depression Research Center, SMU; and Scott Gleeson ’09, Independent Visual Artist.

The Hamon blog team invited Christina Donaldson, an interior designer and researcher, who participated in the panel discussion at Hamon on PTSD, The Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming, on April 5th, to contribute a posting on her research. This panel discussion was organized in conjunction with the Hawn Gallery exhibition, Travels in Ithaca, on view at Hamon until May 16th. Donaldson’s research examines the intersection of interior design and psychology, and how this interdisciplinary approach may yield a better understanding of combat-related PTSD.

Continue reading “Inside Out/Outside In: Investigating the implications of the built environment on Veterans diagnosed with combat-related PTSD”

Carlotta Corpron: Photography and Light

Artist and educator, Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988) is the subject of one of the current exhibitions at the Meadows Museum.  Process and Innovation:  Carlotta Corpron and Janet Turner, on view through June 5, 2016, presents the art of two women who worked as both artists and professors at separate Texan universities during the twentieth century.   Highly experimental, both artists would come into their maturity of style in their respective media of photography and printmaking while teaching in Texas. Continue reading “Carlotta Corpron: Photography and Light”

Travels in Ithaca: A Guided Tour

Charybdis
Charybdis (EMDR Visual Aid), Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in.

The art exhibition Scott Gleeson: Travels in Ithaca charts an uncertain and perilous itinerary through the spaces of the Hamon Arts Library Foyer, Lobby, and the Mildred Hawn Gallery, calling viewers’ attention to the social costs of warfare as seen through the lens of Homeric myth. Each of the twelve graphic works in this site-specific installation reference significant events in the life of Odysseus leading up to his return to Ithaca and eventual murder at the hands of his illegitimate son Telegonus. Together, the twelve works constitute a theoretical proposition about one possible role abstract image making or architectural ornament might play if creative professionals chose to address veterans’ issues in their practices. The overarching question proposed by the exhibit is, “What is the social role or responsibility of the artist in responding to the social costs of war, promoting cultural memory of historical events, and facilitating the healing process for veterans and communities?” To address this question Travels in Ithaca imagines a very specific problem with psychotraumatology literature on the Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy method: “How shall patients benefit from therapy in the absence of the therapist given the problems with long treatment delays in the VA healthcare system?” Travels in Ithaca posits deploying cheap, modular architectural ornamentation and graphic imagery designed to facilitate the self-administration of the EMDR method within domestic or institutional interiors.

Continue reading “Travels in Ithaca: A Guided Tour”

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